News

This past year, my mother downsized from our six-bedroom family home into a two-bedroom condo in a senior development. Although she was nervous to cast aside her old life, now that the deed is done, she feels elated and free—and wishes she'd done it years earlier.

Now, my mom no longer worries about keeping her lawn mowed and driveway clear of snow, because maintenance staff does it for her. Rather than rattling around a huge house that took hours to clean, she has a manageable space she can easily tidy up herself. And, not incidentally, she has more money for whatever comes down the road.

Nonetheless, downsizing can still fill people with dread; experts say this is largely because they've heard horror stories from people who went about it all wrong. Here are the top six mistakes people make when downsizing, plus some ways to make the process easier and less intimidating.

Read more here.

The Hendersonville Board of Realtors Annual Charity Golf Tournament was held at Kenmure County Club on May 21st with over 80 realtors participating.
The Realtors raised funds for our local charity, Henderson County Habitat for Humanity. We had a chance to visit their latest project at Dodd Meadows on Volunteer Way in East Flat Rock.

Tournament check 2018 1
Pictured are Hendersonville Board of Realtors President - Scott Barfield and Habitat for Humanity President - Ron Laughter.

Apply the Code of Ethics to real life situations.

gri course

In this course you will discover:
The various Articles and Standards of Practice contained within the REALTOR® Code of Ethics
Legal compliance statutes and rules
Provisions of the Code of Ethics and state and federal statutory requirements
Ethical obligations to both your clients and fellow REALTORS®

August 22, 2018 

Hosted by: Hendersonville Board of REALTORS®
Instructor: Patrice Willetts

Online registration is HERE.

Welcome to your Closing on a House Checklist—a rundown of everything home buyers need to do in the 11th hour before they get their hands on those keys. Because when you're approaching the finish line in your home-buying journey, you want nothing to go wrong, right?

That’s why we’ve put together a home closing checklist, which outlines your action points in those few days leading up to settlement. Keep this list handy to know you've done what you need to in order to close the deal.

1. Get all contingencies squared away
Most purchase agreements have contingencies—things that buyers must do before this transaction is official, explains Jimmy Branham, a real estate agent at the Keyes Company, in Fort Lauderdale, FL. These are the most common contingencies:
Home inspection contingency: This gives buyers the right to have the home professionally inspected. If something is wrong, you can request it be fixedor you can back out of the sale. Its rarely advisable to waive an inspection contingency. Although the average home inspection costs $300 to $500, its a drop in the bucket considering the costly home issues you might uncover, says Claude McGavic, executive director of the National Association of Home Inspectors.


Appraisal contingency: With this contingency, a third party hired by your mortgage lender evaluates the fair market value of the home. If the appraised value is less than the sale price, the contingency enables you to back out of the deal without forfeiting your earnest money deposit....READ MORE HERE.

Deciding to buy your first home is a little scary. Looking for a home is anxiety-inducing. But actually making an offer? That's a whole different level of panic. Are you choosing the right one? What if you buy this home and the perfect place comes on the market a week later? What if you end up hating the place in a year?

Unfortunately, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all formula for first homes. (If there were, we’d tell you.) And no, we can't totally destress the process (buying a house is a big deal, after all). But we can help you avoid the biggest mistakes. And, as it turns out, some homes just aren’t right for the average first-time buyer. Go ahead and take a look.

1. The one that's a little too ‘cozy'
You may not have children when you buy your first house. You may not even be planning on children. But those plans could change in the next five to 10 years, and that tiny two-bedroom historic bungalow you’ve been eyeing may go from just right to clown-car small.

Read more here